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Archive for the ‘surname Bull’ Category

James Anderson Jordan was born in Georgia sometime between 1812 and 1815. Martha Bull was born in Jasper County, Georgia 20 Mar 1823. They married in Pike County, Georgia 19 Sep 1837. Pike County was the home of Martha’s family.

James and Martha had 9 children: Margaret Ann Augustus born 12 Dec 1838, John Robert born 19 Oct 1841, James Holmes born 05 Aug 1843, Mary Jane Jutson born 28 Sep 1845, Campbell Ambrose Bull born 07 Jan 1848, Mary Susan Dorcas born 29 Oct 1850, Thomas Daniel Clinton born 02 May 1852, Rebecca Adline born 11 Mar 1855 and William Daniel born 29 Oct 1857.

By 1850 much of the Bull/Jordan extended family had relocated to Ashley County, Arkansas. Martha’s brother William S. Bull and his family had moved to Bradley County. By 1860 Jim and Martha moved to Bradley County as well. William’s wife, Mary Ann, died sometime after the birth of their last child, about 1856, and before the 1860 census. I believe that Martha moved her family so as to be of assistance to her widowed brother and his 8 children.

It was in Bradley County that the family weathered the civil war. The two oldest boys served in the army. Bob enlisted in the 9th Arkansas Infantry at Pine Bluff 25 Jul 1861. He was killed at the Battle of Shiloh at Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee 06 Apr 1862. Jim enlisted in 20th Arkansas Infantry at Warren 28 Feb 1862. He died at Corinth, Mississippi 13 May 1862. Family tradition says he died of the measles. I think that after the death of the two oldest sons and considering the hardships endured in Arkansas in 1862, Jim and Martha most likely sent 14 year old Campbell to visit relatives out of state to keep him out of  harm’s way. As of yet, I have little to support the story of his time spent away.

After the war, Campbell married Alice Martha Taylor in Bradley County 02 Dec 1869. Their first two children were born in Arkansas: James Nicholas born 23 Oct 1870 and Emma Rebecca born 26 May 1872. They moved to Williamson County, Texas in 1874. They had 9 more children in Texas.

It was about this time that Cam’s parents, Jim and Martha, and his younger siblings moved to Williamson County, Texas as well. His sister Mary had married James Harvey Denson, a Texan and a veteran that had served in the Texas cavalry in Arkansas, in 1868 and moved to Williamson County. There were also Bull cousins who lived in Circleville. But more about all that later.

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Campbell Ambrose JordanI’ve heard it said that Granny’s father, Campbell Ambrose Jordan (pronounced Jurden), was a mountain man, resourceful and a hard worker. As a young man he went to live with his mother’s family for a time, possibly in the vicinity of present day Kansas. There is a tantalizing note in a spiral notebook left by my grandmother, “per Cam’s memoirs.” If I had one wish, it would be to find someone with a copy of such memoirs.

Cam’s father was James Jordan from Georgia. He was the product of unknown parentage, a foundling, the soul survivor of an Indian attack on a wagon train. The little red headed, blue eyed infant was adopted. It is not known if Jordan was his birth name or if it was the name of his adopted family.

Cam’s mother, Martha Bull, was Indian. The little spiral notebook notes, “She  must have been born about 1820 because she remembered when the stars fell (November 10-12, 1833). She had dark hair, dark eyes and might have had an accent, reportedly calling her husband “Jeem.” The children remembered her telling them to be proud of their native ancestry because they were kin to the great chief Sitting Bull. Some believed that she was not Indian but French. To further complicate matters, Aunt Jip returned from a trip back east and told everyone she had visited the Bull plantation. She said they were descended from the English Bulls. This seemed even less likely.

Jim and Martha’s children were a mixed bag of his fair complexion and her dark complexion. Even today, older family members refer to the “dark Jordans” and the “light Jordans.” The two oldest boys, Jim and Bob, died while serving in the Confederate Army. Cam returned from his stay with Martha’s family with the intention of enlisting but the war had ended. After Cam, there were two younger brothers, Tom and Dan. There were four girls: Ann, Mary, Susie and Rebecca.

After returning to Arkansas, Cam courted and wed Alice Martha Taylor and they settled on a farm. He built a nice little log cabin with a puncheon floor, a luxury in those days. Their first two children, Nick and Emma, were native born Arkansans. After a few years, Cam got the idea to move to Texas. Their land in Arkansas was wooded and hilly and the men wore themselves out clearing it for farming. The word was Texas had lots of good, clear farmland available. So preparations were made to move the family to Texas. As the time to leave neared, Alice did not want to leave her home. She sat on the porch in her rocking chair as the wagon was loaded. Cam left her a horse and wagon and told her that when she was ready, she could come on. Then Cam, the kids and all their belongings drove away. She sat for awhile absorbing every last detail of her home. After a bit, she put the rocking chair in the back of the wagon and took off after her family heading to Texas. 

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